Sunday, February 10, 2013

Autism Experts Recommended by Parents

Many parents are beginning to realize that the expertise they seek is more often than not found in the adult Autistic community (with some new and important writings coming from Autistic children and teens!)

Quotes are below the links.

http://loveexplosions.wordpress.com/2013/02/02/unlock-and-unchain-my-daughter/

"My last post helped me to meet this fabulous group of autistic adults.  And you will be hearing a lot about what they say, and what they think when I have their permissions to share.

THEY, the adult autistic community, are the experts.  And THEY should have everything to do with developing therapies and education for autistic children.
If you’ve never been afforded the opportunity or worse taken the opportunity to get to know an autistic adult, this might seem outlandish to you.
If it does, YOU are so DEAD WRONG."

"This woman articulated so many of my feelings about Evie’s autism–giving them credibility and reason coming from a woman who has autism."

http://outrunningthestorm.wordpress.com/want-to-know-more-about-autism-ask-an-someone-who-is-autistic/



"When I speak with autism parents I hear a lot of questions about the how to handle certain traits or behaviors of their autistic children. Here is my attempt to help parents find answers to some of those questions by reading the words of autistic authors speaking about them."


http://mamabegood.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-science-of-invisibility.html


"Let's be clear.  This research is not studying anxiety in autistic children.  It is studying parents' perspectives of anxiety in autistic children.  That's different. <>  If they want to know what parents think are the behaviors caused by anxiety, then ask parents. ,.<> But do not claim you are developing tools for measuring anxiety in autistic children."


"4. Find autistic adults to talk to or to read their writing. 

One of the best ways I've learned a more complete understanding of autistic lives is by reading the works of autistic persons, by meeting them in person, or by communicating with them on the internet. Talk to autistic persons.  Read what they've written  Get to know them." 

http://emmashopebook.com/2012/08/27/want-to-know-about-autism-ask-an-autistic/


"And then…  what happened?  What changed?  Everything.  I began to question the “truth” about autism.  I began to question the dogma.  I began to question the “facts.”  It was inevitable, I suppose when you read as much as I do.  But the single biggest change occurred because I found Autistic Adults like E." 

Resource List from Mama Be Good

1 comment:

  1. Some blogs by Autistic parents, dedicated to Autistic parenting, from a positive perspective:

    http://www.asparenting.com/

    (more coming when I get a chance)

    ReplyDelete